Replacement cards automatically update in Apple Pay

I received a replacement card from NatWest the other day after requesting one from customer services. It’s got a different card number, expiry and CVV, so I opened up Apple Wallet to update the card for Apple Pay, but to my surprise the old card had automatically been replaced by the new one on both my iPhone and Apple Watch. After a bit of Googling I can see that NatWest, Barclays and Coop say that they do this, but I can’t find any other UK banks mention it (I know for sure HSBC don’t do this). Does anybody know if this is pretty standard? I guess it wouldn’t update automatically if you requested a new card due to your current one being stolen/lost?

It seems HSBC do this as well when a card expires

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Ah, good to know! They’ve never automatically updated for me, but that must be because I’ve requested new ones due to card faults rather than waiting for them to expire.

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Nationwide updates as well…

Can confirm that HSBC updates automatically. It happened to both my debit and credit cards.

Card lifecycle management (CLM) is a mandatory part of the implementation of Apple Pay now so any banks offering Apple Pay as a new service will have this Updating of card details when a card is replaced as standard.

Interestingly another feature that is mandatory for Mastercard branded cards is M4M (Mastercard for Merchants).
Merchants that use this service, Netflix for example, will keep a tokenised version of your card on file and will also know when your card has been replaced and have their details updated automatically.

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Merchants that use this service, Netflix for example, will keep a tokenised version of your card on file and will also know when your card has been replaced and have their details updated automatically.

Will all merchants be using this as of any date? Sounds like a really big advantage to MasterCard to keep their interchange consistent. There’s surely a load of people who’s card expires and forgets to update their payment details.

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While not many merchants use it at the moment there’s a massive incentive for them to use this in future. Upends the existing model where the customer can default on or abandon a subscription by not bothering to update their details when they change. Puts the onus on the customer to have to break that contract.

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My new Amex updated at a few merchants automatically.

I’ve noticed this on Apple Pay too, but I don’t remember it automatically updating on Google Pay. Unless any Google users have seen something different?

I thought this worked by Mastercard pushing out a specially-formatted message to merchants which gave information on card replacements - e.g. if you have card ending 1234 registered to Joe Bloggs, then his new card is now ending 5678?

Unless I have got this totally wrong, it’s then supplying the merchant with your real new card number - not a tokenised number. So it works similarly to tokenisation, in the sense your account can be associated to an active card account which will continue to be associated even if the card is replaced, but it doesn’t protect against hacking or data breaches at the merchant, since they do have your real card number (unlike true tokenisation).

the merchant only gets the last four digits of the card number for display on their site but their token is updated to ‘point’ to the new card meaning the token is not defunct once the card details have changed. they can keep billing.

I see, I did get it wrong!

This is actually quite clever.

I know the merchant is not supposed to store full card numbers in a retrievable form anyway, so this is a very elegant solution to the problem of their authorisation token expiring - and helps avoid problems for the customer when they replace their card. It’s nice not to need to worry about the expiry date of your card, and at the bonus of extra security as well.

You know more about this than I do; do you have any information about whether Visa (and Amex) are making this mandatory too?

If they are, it’s a real step forward for online spending.